Welcome to the Arizona Solar Center

 This is a non-commercial website for solar and renewable energy information in Arizona.

  • New Discovery Could Improve Organic Solar Cell Performance

    While there is a growing market for organic solar cells ­­– they contain materials that are cheaper, more abundant, and more environmentally friendly than those used in typical solar panels – they also tend to be less efficient in converting sunlight to electricity than conventional solar cells. Now, scientists who are members of the Center for Computational Study of Excited-State Phenomena in Read more
  • Know Your Rights

    Arizona law protects individual homeowners’ private property rights to solar access by dissolving any local covenant, restriction or condition attached to a property deed that restricts the use of solar energy. This law sustained a legal challenge in 2000. A Maricopa County Superior Court judge ruled in favor of homeowners in a lawsuit filed by their homeowners association seeking to Read more
  • Home Battery Systems

    Rooftop solar panels are common in Arizona thanks to abundant sunshine, but to get even more use from the technology, homeowners are beginning to pair them with large home batteries. Batteries allow homeowners to store their surplus electricity, rather than send it to the grid in exchange for credit from their electric company. Read more
  • Solar Hot Water

    There are two types of solar water heating systems: active, which have circulating pumps and controls, and passive, which don't. The typical solar water heater is comprised of solar collectors and a well-insulated storage tank. The solar collector is a network of pipes that gathers the sun's energy, transforms its radiation into heat, and then transfers that heat to either Read more
  • Federal Residential Renewable Energy Tax Credit

    (Information provided by DSIRE - Last reviewed 02/19/2009) Incentive Type: Personal Tax Credit State: Federal Eligible Renewable/Other Technologies: Solar Water Heat, Photovoltaics, Wind, Fuel Cells, Geothermal Heat Pumps, Other Solar Electric Technologies Applicable Sectors: Residential Amount: 30% Maximum Incentive: Solar-electric systems placed in service before 2009: $2,000Solar-electric systems placed in service after 2008: no maximumSolar water heaters placed in service before Read more
  • Solar Building Design in Arizona

    The idea of using the sun to meet the energy needs in our buildings has been with us since the time of the Greeks, with some of the design manifestations even evident in the prehistoric structures of Arizona and the Southwest. There is a great historic tradition for Arizona buildings that utilize our most abundant resource, and the current increases Read more
  • How Not to- Battery Connections

    Photo shows the situation after a battery discharge test at 300 amps was terminated on a 1530 AH IBE battery string when one post melted. During the discharge test all cell voltages are logged. The sum of the cell voltages was 2.73 volts lower than the 48-volt string voltage. This is an average of 118 mv per inter-cell connection, 5-10 Read more
  • 1 New Discovery Could Improve Organic Solar Cell Performance
  • 2 Know Your Rights
  • 3 Home Battery Systems
  • 4 Solar Hot Water
  • 5 Federal Residential Renewable Energy Tax Credit
  • 6 Solar Building Design in Arizona
  • 7 How Not to- Battery Connections

Blogs

  1. Solar Center Blog
  2. Guest Blogs
Lucy Mason
06 January 2018

Wishing you a wonderful and Happy New Year!

The year 2017 has gone by quickly, and AriSEIA has accomplished a full and active agenda to further solar and renewable energy in Arizona. 

Geoff Sutton
25 November 2017

In the desert south-west the intense sunshine and long summer days result in uncomfortable and even dangerously high temperatures for about four months.


Will add Guest Blog content here
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Featured

Some things to pay attention to in Arizona

 
ASEA REBOOT

The Arizona Solar Energy Association (ASEA), State Chapter of the American Solar Energy Society ASES), will be holding meetings in a follow-up to the-long awaited updated ASES‚  Chapters handbook and directives.

ASES evolution, in response to some problematic economic and operational conditions, has resulted in a hearty and robust context for the present and the future. ASEA is now responding with an appropriate updating, through local and statewide discussion. 

Interim Chair, Andy Gerl, a past ASEA Chair and Board member, is making arrangements for Arizona solar advocates and supporters, members and non-members, to receive both an update re: ASES adaptation and changes, and to discuss solar in Arizona and the “reboot" of the ASEA  context, goals and objectives, within the context of varied renewable energy groups within the State, such as AriSEIA (the solar trade association); various sustainability groups; Green Building organizations; the recently formed solar hot water businesses non-profit entity; research and development at the universities; and others.

For more information about the ASEA Reboot discussions, contact Andy at andrew@blazingsolar.com  or 602-799-5942

Upcoming:

ASES SOLAR 2019 Call for Participation
48th National Solar Conference
August 5-9, 2019 | Minneapolis, MN



Proposition 127  Constitutional Amendment

Arizona 2018 General Election November 6, 2018

 “Clean Energy for a Healthy Arizona Amendment.”

was not successful 

See: Arizona pro-solar ballot measure fails (after crazy $40 million in spending)

War On Solar

Solar Roots Documentary - Movie Trailer

Dropped Pallet of PV Modules

On October 26, 2017 a pallet of 33 solar modules got "delivered". After spending an hour checking it was determined that amazingly this 1400 pounds of solar modules didn't break a single module after being dropped off the back of the truck.

A Case Study in the Movement towards a 100% Renewable Grid–a Bright Future

Based on recent results, the cost of renewables is now cheaper than coal generation. © American Public Power Association.

In this article, we explore current and future trends in utility-scale solar and wind and the potential for the movement to a 100% renewable electric grid. Using some recent renewable power purchase agreements (PPAs), we perform a case study on an electric co-op in Colorado – the Platte River Power Authority (www.prpa.org/). As we are considering utility-scale renewable project pricing, let’s look at PRPA’s 2017 resource cost as a comparison (see Figure 1).

As of October 2017, PRPA’s total generation costs were averaging about $31/megawatt-hour (MWH), with their coal generation (Rawhide and Craig units) averaging about $27-28/MWH.

Developments for Utility-scale Renewable Power Purchase Agreements (PPAs)

Austin Energy announced in December 2017 that it had accepted a record low US bid for a solar power purchase agreement (https://bit.ly/2DdQJ02). Estimates put this bid as low as $21/MWH fixed for 15 years.

Also, the results of Mexico’s most recent energy auction were released on November 22, 2017, with 16 different bids at an average price of $20/MWH (https://bit.ly/2ATzwYL).

Canadian Solar was awarded 370 megawatts (MW) and Enel Group a new record low wind PPA at $18/MWH (https://bit.ly/2ATzwYL). In December 2017, Xcel Energy released its RFP responses. Xcel received 96 bids for wind, with the median at $18/MWH totaling over 42 gigawatts. Wind plus storage bids had a median bid of $21/MWH.

Based on these results, the cost of renewables is now cheaper than coal generation; as shown above, PRPA’s average cost for coal generation is above $27/MWH. Since PRPA is a located close to the lowest cost coal reserves of the Powder River Basin (https://yhoo.it/2Qh7Rrp) of Wyoming, this is one of the lowest cost coal-fired power plant operators.

The average cost for large investor-owned utilities in 2016 was about $35/MWH for coal, according to the US Energy Information Administration (EIA). Another important aspect of the above renewable bids is that the RFP-to-bid process takes time – maybe over a year. This means we are seeing old renewable energy cost dynamics at play, and current costs may be even cheaper today.

Future Utility-scale Solar Developments

First Solar’s new utility-scale solar module – December 2017 First Solar, one of the largest utility-scale solar module manufacturers, recently started manufacturing a new utility-scale module – the series 6. This new larger format module will not only reduce the cost of the module but also reduce many other balance of system costs. Here is an article that recaps First Solar’s new technology from the firm’s presentation: https://bit.ly/2DEuG7a.

This new module is estimated to cost 40% less to manufacture and will also lower labor installation cost by up to 55%. First Solar is projecting a 40+% decrease in full system costs by 2020. First Solar has confirmed it currently has the lowest cost project structure, so future PPA pricing could be trending below $15/MWH.

The Chinese decision – June 2018 On June 1st, 2018, China’s National Development and Reform Commission (NDRC) set a limit on solar installations to 30 gigawatts (GW) for 2018 (https://bit.ly/2DFEgqq). The ripple effects on the Chinese solar supply chain have driven down costs and the average selling prices of silicon-based solar modules from China. Here is a quote from Cao Haiyun, the CEO of Jinko Solar on June 26, 2018 (https://bit.ly/2N9DPE6): “In terms of cost improvement, we are targeting I think a 20% improvement. And then roughly for the multi and mono products, the cost will improve to 24% to 25%.

Firstly, US$0.24 to US$0.25 is by the end of the year. It’s not Q4 average number. And second one for 2019, it’s too early to evaluate the cost roadmap.” So, with the new Si-based solar module pricing, we could have PPAs fall well below $19/MWH in the USA.

The current trends show First Solar still in the lowest cost position, but the Chinese Si-based manufactures are also reducing costs rapidly. The upcoming competition in the utility solar space will lead to much lower bids in response to Request for Proposals (RFPs) executed in 2018 and 2019. Looking at these new cost dynamics, bids in 2018 and 2019 will fall well below $20/MWH, making the move to a 100% renewable electric grid more feasible.

PRPA Case Study: How Much Renewable Energy Generation Can We Really Achieve?

To compare these recent low PPAs with 2017 generation costs for a utility, I performed a case study on an electric co-op in Colorado – the Platte River Power Authority (PRPA). PRPA is an electric co-op that serves four cities in Colorado: Fort Collins, Longmont, Loveland, and Estes Park. Over the past year, the communities that PRPA serves have called for more renewables and less coal-fired generation (https://bit.ly/2D0c3cS). This trend is not just municipalities, but large corporations (with large electrical loads) as well (https://bit.ly/2xYxKoz). PRPA had about 75% coal generation (Craig and Rawhide) in 2017, at a cost of $27-28/MWH. PRPA also buys federal hydropower (LAP in the graph) at about $32/MWH.

Simulating Renewables with PRPA Load Data

Using the current data points for PPA pricing, I have run grid simulations for PRPA by using the most recent 12 months of hourly load data (8760 model) for this electric co-op. I loaded the 2017 8760 hours of PRPA loads into Homer Energy software.

Homer Energy is an economic grid and micro-grid software modeling platform. Homer analyzes all the possible sources for electric generation and matches each hourly load for the year, with solar, wind, storage, grid sales and purchases. In doing thousands of simulations, Homer arrives at the mix of generation, electric purchases and sales that will minimize the levelized cost of energy (LCOE). The LCOE is a very similar metric to a long-term power purchase agreement (PPA) – a fixed cost for 15-20 years. My simulations included wind, solar, natural gas generation, storage, grid purchases and sales, and they assumed no coal generation. I ran over 100,000 simulations, and many of them had the levelized cost of energy (LCOE) under $25/MWH. The way to look at these results is as “what if” scenario analytics.

Grid Simulation Result

My assumption for solar was for an on-site solar array at PRPA’s existing coal and natural gas plants and for wind projects in Wyoming. I used PPA costs of about $24/MWH for both wind and solar to include some estimates for integration costs.

This modeled system picked 600 MW of solar and 450 MW of wind, resulting in 80% (48.2% wind, 31.4% solar) renewable energy penetration, with grid sales and purchases of about 20% each. The LCOE for this simulation is about $25/MWH, lower than all the current generation costs for PRPA, and lower than PRPA’s total average current cost of generation of $30.85/MWH.

The LCOE of PRPA’s current generation mix would be much higher due to inflation. A future proposed generation mix for PRPA is show above in Figure 2. We can see from this modeling that we can have a future state of 80% renewables, with a lower LCOE than the current cost of coal generation. Also, PRPA would be generating more renewable energy than the energy it provides to its municipalities, selling the excess to others in Colorado – helping them with their renewable targets.

Another important dynamic is the capacity factors for wind and solar. For our Colorado example, wind and solar combined can achieve a 60% capacity factor or better; wind can be over 45%, and utility-scale solar 25%. Wind and solar work well together, as it is windier in the winter and shoulder seasons, and windier at night, whereas solar produces more in the summer and in the daytime.

Summary

The dramatic declines in the cost of renewables are starting to change electric markets and utilities. While there are still technical challenges in a fully 100% renewable grid, how about the 80% renewable grid by 2025-2030?

By combining the extremely low cost of solar and wind, further cost reductions in energy storage, our modeling has shown this high percentage of renewables to be economically achievable. These simulations included wind, solar, natural gas, storage, grid purchases/ sales, and no coal generation. The new energy economy looks bright indeed.

 

About the Author

Bill Ellard is an energy economist and consultant, servicing businesses, utilities, and municipalities, and focusing on distributed energy implementation, solar energy, demand side management, microgrid development, facility energy management, and renewable energy integration. He can be reached at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

From: https://www.ases.org/a-case-study-in-the-movement-towards-a-100-renewable-grid-a-bright-future/

Renewable Energy Setting New Records

Non-hydro renewable energy sources (i.e., biofuels, biomass, geothermal, solar, wind) set new U.S. records for both production and consumption in the first half of 2018, according to a SUN DAY Campaign analysis of data just released by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (https://bit.ly/2OH87mv).

EIA’s latest “Monthly Energy Review” (with summary statistics for the first six months of 2018) reveals that output by non-hydro renewables increased by 7.04% to 4.530 quads (quadrillion Btu) compared to the first half of 2017 (4.232 quads). Solar energy accounted for the largest percentage increase (25.4%), followed by wind (11.2%), biofuels and biomass (2.4% each), and geothermal (1.0%). As a share of total domestic production from all energy sources, non-hydro renewables accounted for nearly a tenth (9.80%).

Including hydropower, renewable energy sources accounted for 13.05% of domestic energy production and 11.76% of consumption. Hydropower’s output actually dropped by 7.0% during the first six months of 2018 compare to the same period in 2017. Consequently, energy production by renewable sources including hydropower grew by only 3.17% compared to the previous year while consumption increased by just 2.54%.

Notwithstanding its decreased generation, hydropower still maintained its role as the leading renewable source accounting for 24.85% of renewable energy production, followed closely by wind (23.37%), which has now moved ahead of biomass (22.73%) and biofuels (19.44%); solar and geothermal provided 7.86% and 1.76% respectively.

The increased output and consumption of renewable energy, however, was less than that of fossil fuels (i.e., coal, gas, oil) whose production grew 8.80% and use by 4.76% during the first half of 2018. In addition, electrical generation by the nation’s nuclear reactors increased by 4.05%. As a consequence, renewable energy’s share of total domestic energy production actually declined from 13.61% in the first half of 2017 to 13.05% in 2018; renewables’ share of energy consumption also dropped from 11.97% to 11.76%.

The expanded production and use of fossil fuels, which accounted for 77.83% of domestic production in the first half of 2018, have resulted in an increase of 3.28% in U.S. carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions from energy consumption. While CO2 emissions from coal dropped 4.79%, that decline was more than offset by an increase of 12.67% in CO2 emissions from natural gas well as higher emissions from oil and biomass (1.91% and 1.76% respectively). Oil remains the primary source of energy-related CO2 emissions (42.40%), followed by natural gas (29.84%), coal (21.51%), and biomass (6.24%).

About SUN DAY Campaign
The SUN DAY Campaign is a non-profit
research and educational organization
founded in 1992 to aggressively promote
sustainable energy technologies as
cost-effective alternatives to nuclear power
and fossil fuels.

from: https://www.ases.org/renewable-energy-setting-new-records/

About

  • Welcome to the Arizona Solar Center

     This is your source for solar and renewable energy information in Arizona. Explore various technologies, including photovoltaics, solar water heating, solar architecture, solar cooking and wind power. Keep up to date on the latest industry news. Follow relevant lectures, expositions and tours. Whether you are a homeowner looking to become more energy efficient, a student learning the science behind the technologies or an industry professional, you will find valuable information here.
  • About The Arizona Solar Center

    Arizona Solar Center Mission- The mission of the Arizona Solar Center is to enhance the utilization of renewable energy, educate Arizona's residents on solar technology developments, support commerce and industry in the development of solar and other sustainable technologies and coordinate these efforts throughout the state of Arizona. About the Arizona Solar Center- The Arizona Solar Center (AzSC) provides a broad-based understanding of solar energy, especially as it pertains to Arizona. Registered Read More
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