Thursday, November 26th, 2015 - 8:43 am 
(Arizona time)

Courtesy, Jim Arwood and Arizona Solar Center

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Built in 1981, this Tempe solar home is 68 percent earth covered or earth bermed. Features include a rock bed for heating and cooling, an attached greenhouse and a solar domestic water heating system.  Courtesy, Jim Arwood.

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In the 1970s many Arizonans turned to alternative building methods in response to the Energy Crisis. Many passive solar homes were constructed throughout Arizona. This home, in Flagstaff, was built in 1978 and provides more than 55 percent of the home's heating needs..  Courtesy, Jim Arwood.

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Passive solar homes in mountain settings reduce energy needs during heating season.  Courtesy, Arizona Solar Center

NOTE: Photos obtained from the photo gallery are to be used for lawful purposes only. Any commercial use must receive prior approval from  the Arizona Solar Center. Credit shall be given to Photographer along with Arizona Solar Center, and no affiliation with Arizona Solar Center is to be implied.



AzSC Blog

Thanksgiving Reflections

When you have been involved in this industry for five decades, it’s hard to look at where solar energy is today -- compared to where it was in the 1970s -- and not be thankful.

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